A little more Luchibang

Life reconstruction of Luchibang by Matt Van Rooijen

After the previous mammoth post on the long and painful history of the publication of the new paper, I still wanted to write a little more about the specimen and what we have learned. As noted in the first post this specimen is preserved alongside a couple of fish and apparently has some soft tissues associated with it.

The istiodactylids are one of those groups where their ecology has been very uncertain with a variety of activities suggested. Based on their affinities with the highly piscivorous ornithocheiroids it’s been suggested they were fish eaters, though their teeth don’t look well suited to catching fish at all, and that little cluster of interdigitating and cutting teeth has been used to put them forwards as scavengers. That doesn’t sit too well either since they appear to generally be quite aquatic in their habits and while we have a great many birds that are specialist scavengers today, none of them are marine soarers.

Luchibang doesn’t actually help resolve this much. While it’s limb proportions and especially long legs point to greater terrestrial competence and might point to an animal that is therefore scavenging more, it’s also preserved with two fish specimens. One of these is down and under the ribs and apparently in the ribcage. In the paper we are cautious over this specimen as small fish are commonly associated with these kinds of Liaoning specimens (indeed, there’s one already here by the head which clearly wasn’t’ eaten) but it is certainly possible that it represented preserved stomach contents.

So we can provide some tentative evidence to support both scavenging and piscivory in this animal (and of course these are not mutually exclusive positions) and so while what we have here is interesting it doesn’t resolve much. This uncertainty is reflected in the very nice life reconstruction that Matt Van Rooijen kindly did for the paper (quite a few years ago now, he’s been sat on it a while!). In the foreground Luchibang is wading in the shallow waters and grabbing a fish while nearby is the carcass of an iguanodontian which is available as an alternate source of sustenance.

One last thing to comment on is the preservation of soft material on the specimen that we interpret as soft tissues. It is really rather poorly preserved and is little more than some stains on the rock but with some regular patterning and shape that appears to be organic. There are several spots and they all look similar and are associated with the skull, the neck and the ulnae. They don’t appear to be parts of the wings suggesting these are skin traces. There’s no indications of any pycnofibers but then, assuming these are soft tissues, they are rather decayed.

That’s quite enough on Luchibang for now, the paper is fully open access so you can read the full description and discussion there. This only leaves me to thank Matt for his artwork, my coauthors and the referees and editors on this paper.

 

 

1 Response to “A little more Luchibang”


  1. 1 kestrelart 12/03/2020 at 9:39 pm

    I love this. Thanks for sharing. To a non palaeontologist, your scientific work is also very evocative.


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