A long overdue welcome to Luchibang

 

Luchibang has arrived

Today sees the publication of a new pterosaur that has been a very long time in coming. There’s a hell of a lot to unpack here with both the animal itself and the history of the research so this is going to take quite some time to get through. So, here’s the start of a lot of information on this really rather unusual animal.

First off, this is an istiodactylid. These are a branch of the pretty familiar ornithocheiroids which include things like Anhanguera and Ornithocheirus and (according to most researchers) aare close to Pteranodon too. In short, a group of medium to large sized, ocean-going fish eaters, many of which have lots of large grabby teeth to go with big wings and small legs. The istiodactylids are really rather unusual in that they have only a few small teeth at the front of the jaws and they also have giant fenestrae in the skulls which makes them very recognisable. Apart from the eponymous British Istiodactylus, they are all known from China which has really quite a diversity of them though in varying degrees of completeness. This is another specimen attributed to the Yixian Formation and its diverse pterosaur biota.

Luchibang immediately becomes important as it’s by far the most complete known istiodactylid. It is, unfortunately, crushed nearly flat, but apart from the back of the skull, the tail and few tiny bits, everything is there. There’s even rare elements like the gastralia and sternum in good condition and there’s not too much overlap of bones meaning everything is visible (though often at odd angles). The loss of the back of the head is especially annoying but otherwise this is an exceptional specimen. This alone would make it important but it also has some patches of what may be soft tissues in places and it’s also apparently got a fish preserved in the chest cavity (more on this later). One top of that, it’s also really big, or at least would have got bigger. The specimen is about 2 m or so in wingspan but it is also a very young animal. One of the major fusions of various elements that we see even in some relatively young pterosaurs, let along subadults or adults, are present and so this animal would have been considerably larger at adult, perhaps being one of the largest istiodactylids.

The skull and upper body of Luchibang xinghe

If you take more than a quick glance, it quickly becomes clear that while Luchibang has the incredibly typical head and tooth arrangement of istiodactylids, it’s also got a few very odd features. Most obviously, the hindlegs are really long and the feet are very big. Although rather incomplete, there is no evidence for anything like these proportions in other istiodactylids or the ornithocheiroids as a whole and marks it out as being quite unusual. In fact, when we plot out the proportions of the fore and hindlimbs, Luchibang plots over with the azhdarchoids rather than other ornithocheirids and otherwise the two groups are quite distinct in their anatomical arrangements.

This rather strongly suggests that Luchibang is doing something rather unusual and was much more terrestrially capable than its relatives and also then led to its name. Luchibang translates from Chinese as the ‘heron wing’ to convey the apparent heron-like attributed of long legs and catching fish, with the species name xingzhe meaning ‘walker’ also relating to this. Although this name was first created many years ago, while this manuscript was making its way through development hell, the pterosaur community lost palaeontologist Lü Junchang. JC, as he was generally known, was a friend and collaborator on various pterosaur projects and so this new taxon then became a great opportunity to honour his work and his memory and so the etymology formally recognises him too.

So, welcome JC’s walking heron wing, and in the next post I’ll talk some more about the long and tortured history of this publication which dates back a full decade.

 

Hone, D.W.E., Fitch, A.J., Ma, F., & Xu, X. 2020. An unusual new genus of istiodactylid pterosaur from China based on a near complete specimen. Palaeontologica Electronica.*

 

*Yes, there’s an error in the abstract with their weird hanging ‘postcranial’ in the last line. We asked the journal to remove it at the proofs stage but they refused because it had already gone for translation, so we can’t fix it. Feel free to mentally delete it yourself. And the ‘original’ planned species name of ‘wuke’ has managed to sneak through the proofing process and appears in Fig 8. Annoying and stupid but doesn’t affect the taxonomy, though it means I’ve effectievbly accidentally created a nomen nudum.

1 Response to “A long overdue welcome to Luchibang”



  1. 1 Ten years in the making of Luchibang | Dave Hone's Archosaur Musings Trackback on 10/03/2020 at 7:59 am
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