A cornucopia of pterosaur papers

I’ve already covered here at some length my paper on the taxonomy of some of the Asian dsungaripterids as related to the rediscovery of some missing material of Noripterus. That paper is my entry to a volume that I have edited with Mark Witton and Dave Martill* and is the collected works that comes off the back of the 2015 Flugsaurier meeting in Portsmouth. This is being published by the Geological Society of London, an august institute to host this, and a nice hark back to the truly seminal 2003 volume they produced from the back of the Toulouse pterosaur meeting. It will be very hard to meet the standards of that collection (not least as it contained some absolutely fundamental papers on systematics and critical specimens) but I hope not to stand too much in that particular shadow.

Unlike many previous volumes this has the advantage of papers being published online as they come in and so we do not need to wait for the final paper to be sorted before the volume becomes available. That means that a number of papers are already available to read, even though not all of them are yet back from edits by authors and approval by the editorial team. We do hope to have the paper version out by the end of the year, but in the meantime there’s a pile of papers to enjoy.

There’s a diversity of subjects covered here with papers describing new specimens, revisions of existing taxa, new genera being named (or resurrected), a major new phylogenetic analysis, studies on muscles, jaws, and wings as well as various other bits and bobs. I won’t go through them one by one, you can see the list here (and it will continue to update as papers come in). The volume is, sadly, not OA but the production of PDFs means that authors have copies that can be readily disseminated so as with many papers, an e-mail should secure you a copy (and people like to know their work is being read). There should be something in here for everyone (provided of course you like pterosaurs) but here’s a select group of personal highlights so far (and some other important and interesting papers are coming).

First off would be Mark Witton’s excellent review of pterosaurs in food chains – both things they ate and that ate them. This deals exclusively with direct evidence of diet (stomach contents and the like) of which there is a fair bit, rather than so much work which is understandably often built on inferences about these relationships. It’s an excellent foundation for this area which is growing quite rapidly.

Next would be Chris Bennett’s paper with Paul Penkalski on a bizarre Pteranodon that has a striped skull. This isn’t (sadly) colour patterning or soft tissues but remarkably seems to be a pattern of the bone itself. It’s really quite strange and shows that even pterosaurs we know well can pop up with some big surprises.

Finally there’s Colin Palmer’s paper on the properties of pterosaur wing membranes. Although not the first to tackle this subject, since the last major review and set of hypotheses on their performance, we have learned a lot about the structure of the soft tissues, the layers that go into it, and the size and shape and extent of the main wing as well as the orientations in which it likely functions. That makes a synthesis like this very useful as both a review of where we are and what we might expect as well as giving us ideas to test.

I’ll leave that here for now and let readers explore the volume as it firms up. It only remains for me to thank my co-editors and the various referees as well as of course the authors themselves and the people at the Geological Society for their help with producing this volume and  look forwards to seeing the final printed version.

 

 

  • For the record as this kind of thing has caused consternation among some before, I did not have anything to do as editor with my own authored paper. It was handled entirely independently by the other editors and I had no access or input to the process (and nor did they to their own papers). In a small field like pterosaur research it’s hard if not impossible to find referees and editors who are truly independent, and it’s a bit odd to exclude people who have the knowledge to edit a volume from contributing to it, so this is the best solution. This really is common in lots of specialist volumes, but it’s worth noting that it was done as transparently and ethically as possible.

 


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