Flugsaurier 2015: Portsmouth, UK

Way back in 2001 the first real symposium dedicated solely to pterosaurs (rather than a subset of another conference) was convened in Toulouse thanks largely to the organisation of Eric Buffetaut. By all accounts it was a success and spawned the well known and much cited 2003 Evolution and Palaeobiology of Pterosaurs special volume. The event however was something of a one-off, and I don’t think there was any great plans to have another later conference.

At the end of my time in Germany however, I wanted to arrange a conference and with the museum home to some legendary pterosaur specimens and the retiring Peter Wellnhofer, this ultimately led to Flugsaurier 2007 in Munich. Both a celebration of all things pterosaurian and a tribute to Peter’s career, this was attended by nearly 50 people with delegates from North and South America, Asia, Australia and Europe, and later spawned the 2008 Festschrift for Peter. At the meeting it was agreed that this would be an excellent series to continue and so Flugsaurier 2010 in Beijing was immediately announced, and then this was followed by a shift to South America and Rio 2013 collectively covering three of the great centres for pterosaur finds and research. Each meeting has seen a swathe of researchers descend on the host institute and the unveiling of some up to the minute research and important new finds.

Now though, Flugsaurier returns to Europe and will be in Portsmouth in 2015 from August 25th-30th. Dave Martill is the main organiser of this one at his parent university, ably assisted (well, we think so) by a small army of associates. As has become usual for Flugsaurier, the conference will consist of talks and posters about pterosaurs, workshops and round-table discussions, specimen viewings and fieldtrips. It is NOT limited to academics, and we have a good record of artists, non-pterosaur specialists, curators, and the general public attending as delegates as well as early-career researchers like MSc and PhD students presenting their work. As a generally small meeting, it is rather informal and there’s lots of break-outs and discussions between presentations and through the breaks and evenings and much to talk over.

All the major details are on the website for the event here, and the first circular is already out and online here. Do please share these links with the wider academic and social community (we have tried and failed to get e-mails to the DML and VertPal list so if someone could send out the links, that would be wonderful, thanks), there is a group on Facebook, an @Flugsaurier2015 twitter feed and also we’re using the hashtag #flugsaurier2015 to keep people up to date. More information will follow soon, but the basics are up and online and registration will open shortly.

Some of the best interactions and exchanges we have had at previous meetings have come from those who normally only dabble in pterosaurs and are bringing external ideas and methods into the community so while obviously there is a *lot* of winged reptile stuff going round, it’s not just a meeting of the usual pterosaur suspects. Indeed in this case we really hope for a bit more of that at this one as thanks to some cunning timing, the meeting will run just before SVPCA in the neighbouring city of Southampton.

Yes, you can attend two palaeontological conferences in succession! SVPCA, for those that have never been, is a meeting for vertebrate palaeontology and comparative anatomy. Although very UK centric, SVPCA always attracts a number of European delegates and even those from further afield (Matt Wedel and Don Henderson regularly attend for example) but is also a small meeting (generally around 130 people) and as such is an informal and fun community. There’s no parallel sessions and a relaxed and fun atmosphere (last year we had a presentation done in song with guitar backing!) and it also includes a day for preparators and conservators on top of covering everything from fish to hominids over the run time. SVPCA is also a special haven for palaeoart people (Bob Nicholls, Luis Rey, Mark Witton and John Conway are always there, and those with big outreach profiles like Darren Naish and Dougal Dixon also always attend). In short, those who might be considering a major journey from across the ocean for just a few days of pterosaurs and think it a bit much money and commitment, well the opportunity to combine it with SVPCA hopefully makes it a still greater proposition.

The fieldtrips will also be run in such a way as to maximise this too. A pre-conference excursion to the Isle of Wight on August 25th will effectively start Flugsaurier, and then a post-conference weekend field trip to the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site on August 29th and 30th will be run jointly with SVPCA as a prelude to that meeting.

Hopefully then there’s some excellent scope for friends, colleagues, researchers and interested people from all over the world to take the opportunity to come to the UK and both meetings. Pterosaurs may not be your first or only love, but the integration with SVPCA makes a superb opportunity to combine the two and see two whole vertebrate meetings. Both are relatively cheap, and with an international community heading over for Flugsaurier as well as a European crowd for SVPCA, it will hopefully be both intimate and wide-ranging.

As a quick aside, note that the plan was always for Flugsaurier to be on a cycle of every three years, but we quickly realised that this cycle specifically ran with the huge ICVM and was sucking up some of our potential delegates who naturally did not want to make two big international trips per year on top of the usual SVPCA / SVP trips. So this one comes just two years after Rio, but we should return to the previous cycle after this and hopefully someone will be volunteering to host Flugsaurier 2018.

I do hope to see an excellent turn out for both (apparently we’re running at nearly two dozen registered for Flugsaurier already in just the first few days of putting out the first circular) and that will grow quickly I’m sure. Roll on 2015!


@Dave_Hone on Twitter

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 457 other followers


%d bloggers like this: