Extra final bonus Gorgosaurus preparation post

Well, it has been a while since the last post where we finally rounded up and summarised Darren’s massive series of posts on preparing a Gorgosaurus specimen. Here Darren summarises the prep work done since and provides new photos of the skull now seen from the others side.

After a long hiatus, I update the Gorgosaurus preparation series, with this, the final installment. Since the last posting, the entire specimen, and select parts thereof were moulded in a high-quality silicone rubber compound so detailed casts of the specimen can be made in the future. After the moulds were removed, the entire specimen was covered in a separating layer of wet tissue paper, and then plastered over and flipped over.

The side now facing up is that which faced up in the field. As this is the upward-facing side, and there was only low rock overburden in the field, this side of the skeleton was more exposed to the effects of rain, frost, rock fracturing and rock expansion/contraction from summer heat (up to +40C) and cold winter temperatures (down to – 40C). Because of this, this side of the specimen is less well preserved, in fact I’d say in many places it is poorly preserved- in some areas the bone is like the consistency compressed hot chocolate powder. Bones are also badly crushed in many places. If I can remove the equivalent of a sugar-cube sized piece of rock per day, that is pretty good going as I super detail the many bones preserved. The skull, being better ossified, was in better shape, but the bone quite splintery in places. This means the work has proceeded very, very slowly. The tools and techniques were much the same as in earlier postings, though much of the work is being done with a head-mounted magnifying lens and later, probably microscope work. Also the work has to go much slowly. It can be seen that the posterior right side of the face is missing. This is because as the carcass rotted, the side of the head, exposed to water currents, was disarticulated and piece by piece the bones were washed away. We have a couple of them, but are missing 6-7 to make a full skull. However, we get a beautiful side view of the braincase which is important for researchers. We had the whole skull CT scanned recently and really nice images resulted for study by one of the Royal Tyrrell Museum scientists.

Preparation work on this side has also revealed some anatomical details that are important to future scientific study and eventual publication(s) that cannot be shared here or at this time and therefore, this series must end with this posting. I have been happy to share the preparation of this gorgeous little specimen with you all and hope you learned something about the intricacies of fossil preparation.

Best, Darren Tanke, Senior Technician II, Royal Tyrrell Museum, Drumheller, Alberta, Canada.

As usual all images are copyright to Darren / the Tyrrell Museum.

7 Responses to “Extra final bonus Gorgosaurus preparation post”


  1. 1 Owosso Harpist 26/03/2012 at 1:24 pm

    That is one beautiful skull.

  2. 2 Robert A. Sloan 26/03/2012 at 1:32 pm

    Beautiful. Thanks for this final post on the Gorgosaurus skull and the great photos!

  3. 3 Mark Robinson 27/03/2012 at 4:38 am

    Thanks again, Darren, for this series. It was certainly very interesting and educational.

  4. 4 Your Name's not Bruce? 27/03/2012 at 5:41 am

    I can hardly wait for the papers that are going to come out of this!

  5. 5 Kilian Hekhuis 27/03/2012 at 10:56 am

    Yeah, thanks again, and if you’re ever preparing something new don’t hesitate to post it here!

  6. 6 Dave Dunford 02/10/2012 at 4:33 pm

    Ditto from me – I know little or nothing about palaentology other than a general interest in natural history but I stumbled on this and read it all. Fascinating reading and a great insight into an area of science I knew nothing about.


  1. 1 Darren Tanke’s Gorgosaurus preparation: final roundup « Dave Hone's Archosaur Musings Trackback on 02/09/2012 at 8:46 pm

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